pasta around the world

pasta around the world


PFor many, pasta is a simple, hearty dish, like chicken noodle soup. While for others it is a bomb of exotic and amazing spices. Short, long, spiral or straight: pasta is one of the most popular foods in the world. Almost every culture has developed some sort of special dish, from pasta and lasagna to udon and pho, which means we’ve all enjoyed this delicacy at one time or another. Here are some of our favorite recipes from around the world.

1. SOUTHWEST RAMEN

Tucson, Arizona, USA. This complete dish is inspired by “carne adobada”, a stew that is ubiquitous in Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. In this version, we have a delicious soup flavored with smoked chili and topped with thick ramen noodles. Roasted vegetables give it a pleasant taste, and arugula adds freshness.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

2. YAKI UDON TO THE SHEPHERD

Mexico City, Mexico. The hardest part about tacos is finding premium tortillas like the ones made in Mexico. This yaki udon al pastor solves that problem by pairing fried udon noodles with pork and beef al pastor. The result is like a happy ending to a fairy tale.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

3. CHEESESTICK FILLY WITH TOOL MATZEMEN

Philadelphia, USA. This recipe combines two of our favorite dishes: pasta and the famous Philadelphia cheesesteak. Let’s start with mazemen, “dry” noodles (without soup), very popular in Japan. Once cooked, we season instant ramen with soy and oyster sauces, then combine it with deep-done steak chunks, green peppers, red onions, and a dash of Cheez Whiz® that completely melts and blends into the noodles.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

4. PASTA AND CHEESE WITH SHAWL AND PUMPKIN

England. Originally from the United Kingdom, where they are called “macaroni cheese” (macaroni and cheese), Pasta with cheese they are just as popular with the British as they are with the Americans. Our version pays homage to England with some mustard and cheese. Cheddarwhile the pumpkin sauce lends a decidedly American flavor.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

5. MAFALDA FROM GARBAGE METALS AND SQUID

Malaga, Spain. This dish is inspired by the beautiful and serene summer we spent in Spain. It’s been a wonderful few weeks, with squid in abundance, from homemade squid to squid paella and, of course, squid pasta. We make this recipe every time we want to remember those days of peace and sunshine because the fragrance invites you to imagine that you have all the time in the world to sit down and watch life go by.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

6. KAZARECH MOULES FRITE

Brussels, Belgium. This is our version of a Belgian classic: mussels with French fries. The only thing we replace is pasta potatoes Casarecce (short tubes, similar to french fries). Otherwise, we follow the traditional recipe, seasoning the mussels with white wine, shallots and butter. A little saffron gives the drink a beautiful golden color.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

7. LASAGNE BOLOGNESE

Bologna, Italy. Lasagna is pasta par excellence. Big, wide… Paradise for lovers of this food! And, in our humble opinion, this version is the mother of all lasagna: layers of tender pasta, Bolognese sauce – thick, silky, flavorful umami this gives it our secret ingredient (fish sauce), a creamy béchamel sauce and lots of parmesan cheese. The perfect baked dish.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

8. LAXA

Malaysia. The big thing about laksa is the combination: rice noodles floating in salted rice and coconut broth, flavored with citronella. [limoncillo, hierba de limón], dried shrimp, chili and turmeric, as well as boiled meat, seafood and fresh herbs. The ocher-colored broth has an intense flavor umamiwith sweet, sour and salty aftertaste.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

9. BUN BO HYUE

Hue, Vietnam. bo hugh bun (the name translates as “meat noodle soup of the city of Hue”) – an unforgettable classic of street food. And the best part is that there is no special way of cooking. Of course, an important ingredient is satay sauce: a fragrant product made from citronella, shallots, garlic and chili. If you serve the soup with a little fresh banana blossom, the result will be much more similar to what is offered on the streets of Hue.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

10. Noodle Biang Biang

Shaanxi Province, China. Invented in central China, these thick, wide noodles used to be a peasant food. While there are many hypotheses about the name—it is said to come from the sound the noodles make when they hit the table, or the sound diners make when they eat them—there are many more theories about the complexity of the noodles. Chinese ideogram. biang (consists of 58 strokes). In short, the only thing you need to know is that they are tasty, satisfy your appetite quickly and are very persistent, so they can be fried, mixed and added to soup.

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

11. RAMEN

Tokyo, Japan. We consume over 100 billion packages of instant noodles every year, making Momofuku Ando’s invention one of the most influential products of our time. If you have a craving for real ramen but can’t find a specialty store, rest assured instant presentations will satisfy your craving; with the added benefit that many of them include flavor sachets that are very similar to the original recipes. A simple natural food, instant noodles have become one of the most popular and famous dishes in the world. So much so that they even inspired the ramen museum in Yokohama. H

(Photo: Michael Le/Workman Publishing Company)

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Taken from This noodle, Mike and Stephanie Le; Workman Publishing © 2022. Published in collaboration with Newsweek. Published in collaboration with Newsweek.

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